MongoDB Replication: 3 Easy Methods to Replicate Data

on Data Integration, Data Warehouse, ETL, Tutorials • December 31st, 2021 • Write for Hevo

MongoDB Replication - Featured Image

Data Replication is a must to keep your data protected. It ensures not only the high availability of data but also the ease of access, especially in the event of any unexpected errors such as a system crash, hardware or software-based errors, etc.

MongoDB Replication takes place with the help of MongoDB Replica Sets. Each MongoDB Replica Set contains a set of MongoDB instances, in a way that all contain the same data or by using the concept of Sharding, allowing users to distribute data across various machines.

The present article aims at providing a step-by-step guide to help you set up MongoDB Replication and help you replicate your MongoDB data with ease. A complete walkthrough of the content will help you develop the skill to set up MongoDB Replication using various methods.

Table of Contents

What is MongoDB?

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It is a high-performance document-oriented database that is powered by a NoSQL structure. It makes use of collections (tables) each having multiple documents (records) & allows the user to store data in a non-relational format. 

MongoDB stores its data as objects which are commonly identified as documents. These documents are stored in collections, analogous to how tables work in relational databases. MongoDB is known for its scalability, ease of use, reliability & no compulsion for using a fixed schema among all stored documents, giving them the ability to have varying fields (columns). 

For further information on MongoDB, you can check the official site here.

Why Replication?

MongoDB Replication is a necessary feature because of the following benefits it offers:

  • With multiple copies of data placed on several servers, MongoDB Replication provides High(24*7) availability of data.
  • Better data protection as a failure of a single server won’t lead to data loss. 
  • In cases of hardware failures and service interruptions, quick disaster recovery is possible.
  • Eliminates any downtime required for maintenance such as backups, index rebuilds, or compaction.
  • Replica sets are transparent to your application. 
  • Read scaling (additional copy for reading).

What is MongoDB Replication?

MongoDB Replication: MongoDB Replication | Hevo Data
Image Source: MongoDB

MongoDB Replication is the process of making data available across multiple data servers. Data Replication ensures data security not only in the case of a single server failure, but also in the case of a hardware failure. Replication stores multiple data copies across various data servers, allowing users to recover data whenever required.

MongoDB supports replication with the help of Replica Sets. These Replica Sets are a combination of various MongoDB instances, each having a single primary node and multiple secondary nodes. The secondary node automatically copies the changes made to the primary node, ensuring the same data is maintained across all servers. During the time of a failover or recovery process, the election mechanism chooses the new primary node.

Key features of Replication:

  • Scalability: As the data volume increases the complexity of accessing data and working with data also increases. With replication in place, multiple data copies are available, allowing users to not only increase their data reserves but also recover any previous version in case of any errors or failures.
  • Performance: When data is available across multiple machines and servers, it not only makes accessing data easier but also makes recovering from unexpected and sudden failures much easier. replication ensures data availability and security at all times.
  • Availability: With replication in place, there’s no need to worry about data failures. In situations where your primary source of data fails, you can easily access the same up-to-date data from a secondary reserve. This highly promotes data availability.

Setting up MongoDB Replication can be a time-consuming task and needs proper technical expertise to manually carry out the process. This requires you to monitor and verify that the replication is done correctly. A more economical and effortless solution is using a Cloud-Based ETL tool like Hevo Data. Hevo pre-built connectors allow you to set up MongoDB Replication for both Generic MongoDB and MongoDB Atlas in just a few clicks without having to write a single line of code!

Key Features of Replica Set

Some key features of the Replica Set MongoDB are as follows:

  • Replica Set is a cluster of N nodes with several data-bearing nodes and one arbiter node.
  • With Replica Set, any node can be a primary server node.
  • You will have automatic failover and recovery with Replica Set.
  • When you perform any write operation with Replica Set, it goes to the primary server node.

For further information on the MongoDB Replication setup, you can check the official documentation here.

How MongoDB Replication Works

MongoDB Replication is managed by Replica Set where multiple MongoDB nodes are grouped as a unit. For MongoDB Replication, a Replica Set requires at least 3 MongoDB nodes. Here, one node will be considered as the primary node that will do all the write operations received. The other nodes will become the secondary nodes and they will replicate data from the primary node.

The secondary nodes will perform only read operations so, they can be configured through a supported MongoDB client. Whenever the primary node is unavailable to deliver the request of data, the secondary node will provide continuous data needed. In such a case, the primary node selection is made through a process called Replica Set Elections, where the most suitable secondary node is selected as the new primary node.

Heartbeat Process

Heartbeat is the method of finding out the current state of the MongoDB nodes in a replica set. Here, the replica set nodes to ping each other every two seconds. If a node does not ping within 10 seconds,  other nodes in the replica set mark the node as unreachable. 

This feature is important for automatic failover processes where the primary node is unreachable and no heartbeat is received from the secondary node within the allotted time frame. MongoDB then automatically assigns a secondary server that acts as the primary server.

Replica Set Elections

The replica set selection is used to find out which MongoDB node should be the primary node. These choices can occur when: 

  •  Loss of connection to the primary node that is recognized by the heartbeat process. 
  •  Replica set initialization 
  •  Add a new node to an existing replica set 
  •   Replica set Maintenance using stepDown or rs.reconfig method 

 During the election process, the first node sets a flag that requires an election, and all other nodes vote to elect that node as the primary node. Assuming the replication configuration settings are the default values, the average time to complete the selection process is 12 seconds.

A key factor that can affect the time it takes to complete a selection is network delay. This can delay the reestablishment operation on the replica’s new primary node. The replica set cannot handle write operations until the selection is complete. However, if the read query is configured to be processed on the secondary node, you can stage the read. MongoDB 3.6 supports connection drivers that need to be configured to retry required writes.

Dealing with MongoDB Replication Delay

One of the major problems while performing a MongoDB Replication is the delay or lag in the process. When there is a delay in the replication process to a secondary node after an update to the primary node in the replica set.

A few factors are listed below that can increase the MongoDB Replication delay:

  • Network Latency: If the network is insufficient to deliver the needs for the replication process it will cause a delay in data replication to the entire Replica Set. It is a good practice to route your traffic in a stable network with sufficient bandwidth.
  • Disk Throughput: If the disks used in primary and secondary nodes are different like the primary node has SSD and the secondary node has HDD then there will be a delay in the writing process on the secondary node.
  • Heavy Workloads: Executing heavy and long-running write operations on the primary nodes will lead to a delay in the replication process. It is always a good practice to configure the MongoDB Write Concern correctly.
  • Database Operations: Some Database queries take more time to execute. With the help of a Database Profiler, one can identify and optimize the queries.

What is Sharding in MongoDB?

MongoDB Replication: MongoDB Sharding | Hevo Data
Image Source: MongoDB

MongoDB scales immensely using a technique known as Sharding to handle enormous volumes of data. MongoDB handles the data storage requirements using the concept of Sharding, which includes distributing data and storing it across various machines. Sharding allows MongoDB to scale horizontally and handle the read-write load easily.

Sharding makes use of three components:

  • Shards: It is the location where the data is stored.
  • Config Server: These servers help map data from a cluster to a Shard, which is then used by query routers to perform operations specific to a particular Shard. 
  • Query Server: These servers allow users to access and perform operations on the desired MongoDB Shards.

For further information on Sharding in MongoDB, you can check the official documentation here.

Replication vs Sharding in MongoDB

Replication refers to the practice of copying data from the primary server node to secondary server nodes. It increases data availability and promotes backup, in case your primary server fails. It copies data on every server.

Sharding refers to the process of handling horizontal scaling across various servers using a shared key. You will copy data holistically by sharding copies of pieces of data across various replica sets. All these replica sets work together to utilize all the data.

When sharding and replication work together, they are referred to as a shared cluster. Each shard is replicated to preserve the same data availability.

MongoDB Replica Set vs MongoDB Cluster

Replica sets create several copies of the same record through a replica set node. The basic goals of the MongoDB replication set are as follows:

  •  Availability of data  
  •  Specify a built-in backup solution 

 Cluster work is different. The MongoDB cluster distributes data through multiple nodes using the shard key. In this process, data is divided into multiple titles. These are called shards and it copies each shard to another node.  The main purpose of the cluster is to support very large data records and high-throughput operations by horizontal scaling of workloads. The main differences between a replica set and a cluster are:

  • The replica set copies the entire dataset. 
  • Clusters distribute workloads and store data (shards) on multiple servers.  

MongoDB allows users to create sharding clusters to combine these two features. In a sharding cluster, each shard is replicated to a secondary server to provide high data availability and redundancy.

Methods for MongoDB Data Replication

Method 1: MongoDB Replication Using Hevo Data

Hevo Data, an Automated Data Pipeline, provides you with a hassle-free solution to perform MongoDB Replication with an easy-to-use no-code interface. Hevo is fully managed and completely automates the process of not only loading data from MongoDB but also enriching the data and transforming it into an analysis-ready form without having to write a single line of code. Hevo empowers you to replicate data from both Generic MongoDB and MongoDB Atlas in a loss-less manner.

Hevo’s fault-tolerant Data Pipeline offers a faster way to move your data from MongoDB and 100+ other data sources (including 40+ free data sources) into Data Warehouses, Databases, BI Tools, or any other destination of your choice. Hevo will take full charge of the data replication process, allowing you to focus on key business activities

Method 2: MongoDB Replication Using Replica Set

MongoDB lets users conveniently replicate their data using Replica Sets and use them for various purposes such as testing, development, production, etc. This method requires you to first create a new MongoDB Replica Set and then convert it into a standalone Replica.

Method 3: MongoDB Replication Using Sharding

MongoDB lets users conveniently use the concept of Sharding, allowing you to replicate data across multiple servers. This method requires you to first create a MongoDB Shard and then convert the Shard standalone into a Shard Replica Set.

Methods to Set up Replication in MongoDB

Before going ahead with the techniques to set up MongoDB Replication, ensure the following prerequisites:

  • Working knowledge of MongoDB.
  • MongoDB is installed at the host workstation.
  • A general idea of using the command line.

There are multiple ways in which you can perform MongoDB Replication:

Method 1: MongoDB Replication Using Hevo Data

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Hevo Data, a No-code Data Pipeline, helps you replicate data from MongoDB to Data Warehouses, Business Intelligence Tools, or any other destination of your choice in a completely hassle-free & automated manner.

Hevo supports data replication from both Generic & Atlas versions of MongoDB. Moreover, with Hevo, you can either Poll your data using MongoDB’s OpLog or perform Real-time streaming of data using MongoDB’s Change Streams.

To learn more, check out Hevo’s documentation for MongoDB Replication.

Check out what makes Hevo amazing:

  • Auto Schema Mapping: Hevo takes away the tedious task of schema management & automatically detects the schema of incoming data from MongoDB and replicates it to the destination schema.
  • Quick Setup: Hevo with its automated features, can be set up in minimal time. Moreover, with its simple and interactive UI, it is extremely easy for new customers to work on and perform operations.
  • Hevo Is Built To Scale: As the number of sources and the volume of your data grows, Hevo scales horizontally, handling millions of records per minute with very little latency.
  • Incremental Data Load: Hevo allows the transfer of data that has been modified in real-time. This ensures efficient utilization of bandwidth on both ends.

With continuous real-time data movement, Hevo allows you to replicate your MongoDB data along with your other data sources and seamlessly load it to the destination of your choice with a no-code, easy-to-setup interface. Try our 14-day full-feature access free trial!

Get Started with Hevo for Free

Method 2: MongoDB Replication Using Replica Set

You can use the following methods to create and deploy your Replica Sets:

Creating a New MongoDB Replica Set

You can set up a new Replica Set in MongoDB using the following steps:

Step 1: Starting the MongoDB Instances

To start the MongoDB instance, specify the port value for your Mongo instance along with the path to your MongoDB installation on your system. Use the following command to enable your MongoDB instance:

$ mongod --port 27017 --dbpath /var/lib/mongodb --replSet replicaSet1

MongoDB uses port 27017 as its default port number. In case the user doesn’t specify the port number, MongoDB automatically establishes a connection with the default port.

The –repelset parameter specifies the name of the replica set, which will store various MongoDB instances. Here the Replica Set is called replicaSet1.

Step 2: Configuring the Replica Set

A replica set contains multiple instances that communicate with each other. To establish communication between them, you need to specify the hostname along with their IPs as follows:

MongoDB Replication: Configuring the Replica Set | Hevo Data
Image Source: Redash

You can also connect them by using the following lines of code:

mongo –host node-2 –port 27017
mongo –host node-3 –port 27017

To establish a complete connection, you need to use these commands once with every server by changing the server/nodes as required.

Step 3: Enabling Replication in MongoDB 

Once you’ve made all the configurations, you now need to open the Mongo Shell with your primary instance and use the initiate command as follows:

rs.initiate()

You will now see the following output on your system. This indicates that the replication process has begun:

MongoDB shell version v3.4.10
connecting to: mongodb://172.34.21.121:27017
MongoDB server version: 3.4.10
> rs.initiate()
{
"info2": "no configuration specified. Using a default configuration for the set",
"me" : "example:27017",
"ok" : 1

This is how you can use the rs.initiate() command to start the replication process. The Mongo Shell will now change its prompt to the name of your Replica Set, replicaSet1.

Step 4: Adding MongoDB Instances to Replica Sets

Once you’ve initialized your Replica Set, you can now begin to add the various MongoDB instances to it using the add command as follows:

rs.add(<servername:port>)

For example, if you want to add the node-2 and node-3 to replicaSet1, you can use the following command in your Mongo Shell:

rs.add('node-2:27017')
rs.add('node-3:27017')
MongoDB Replication: Adding Nodes | Hevo Data
Image Source: Medium-Samuel Addico

The output {‘ok’:1} indicates that a MongoDB instance has been successfully added to the Replica Set. To check the status of the replication, you can use the status command as follows:

rs.status()

The status command will produce the following output if the MongoDB instances have been added successfully:

MongoDB Replication: Status | Hevo Data
Image Source: Medium-Samuel Addico

This is how you can add MongoDB instances to your Replica Sets.

Step 5: Removing Instances from Replica Sets

MongoDB Replica Sets also allow users to remove single or multiple instances they’ve added to the replica set using the remove command. To remove a particular instance, you first need to shut it down using the following command:

db.shutdownserver

Once you’ve shut down the server, you need to connect with your primary server and use the remove command as follows:

rs.remove("server_name")

For example, if you want to remove the “node-2” instance from replicaSet1, you can use the following command:

rs.remove("node-2")
Step 6: Testing the Replication Process

You can test the process by adding a document in the primary node. If replication is working properly, the document will automatically be copied into the secondary node.

First, connect to the primary node and add a document using the insertOne command as follows:

replicaSet1: PRIMARY> use movies
switched to db movies
replicaSet1:PRIMARY> db.release_year.insertOne({ name: "Example", year: 2017})
{
"acknowledged" : true,
"insertedId" : ObjectId("5a018ea7c89da78ba2076f25")
}
replicaSet1: PRIMARY>

Switch to your secondary node, node-2 using the following command:

mongo -host node-2 -port  27017

If replication has taken place properly, the document in your primary node will automatically be copied to the secondaries. You can check this using the find command as follows:

replicaSet1: SECONDARY> use movies
switched to db movies
replicaSet1:SECONDARY> db.release_year.find();

The find command will access the database movies and the collection release_year and output the stored documents as follows: 

{ "_id" : ObjectId("5a018ea7c89da78ba2076f25"), "name" : "Example", "year" : 2017 }
resplicaSet1:SECONDARY>

The above output indicates that the document was automatically replicated into the secondary node. This is how you can easily set up MongoDB Replication using Replica Sets and perform various operations on them.

Converting a Standalone to MongoDB Replica Set

MongoDB allows its users to transform their standalone MongoDB instances into a Replica Set. Standalone instances are used in the testing and development process, whereas the Replica Sets are a part of the production phase.

First, shut down your mongod instance using the following command:

db.adminCommand({"shutdown":"1"})

Restart your mongod instance. You must use the –repelSet parameter in your command to specify the Replica Set you’re going to use. Users must specify the name of the server along with their unique IPs in their command as follows:

mongod --port 27017 --dbpath /var/lib/mongodb  --replSet replicaSet1 --bind_ip localhost,<hostname(s)|ip address(es)>

Connect your Mongo Shell with your MongoDB instance and use the initiate command to start the replication process and successfully convert your standalone MongoDB instance into a Replica Set.

You can now perform all the basic operations such as adding an instance, removing an instance, etc. using the following commands:

rs.add(“<host_name:port>”) & rs.remove(“host-name”)

You can even check the status of your replica set, using the rs.status() and rs.conf() commands.

This is how you can convert your standalone MongoDB instance into a MongoDB Replica Set.

For further information on creating Replica Sets in MongoDB, you can check the official documentation here.

Method 3: Setting up MongoDB Replication Using Sharding

MongoDB lets users conveniently use the concept of Sharding, allowing you to replicate data across multiple servers. You can use the following methods to replicate your MongoDB data using Sharing :

Creating a New MongoDB Shard as a Replica Set

You can replicate your MongoDB data into various Shards using the following steps:

Step 1: Creating Config Servers for MongoDB

Launch MongoDB server on your system and login as a superuser. You can use the following command to start as a superuser:

Sudo su

Once you’ve logged in, you need to create the required directories for your three Replica Sets. You can use the following lines of code to create them:

Commands for Config Server:

mkdir /var/lib/cfgsvr0
mkdir /var/lib/cfgsvr1
mkdir /var/lib/cfgsvr2

Commands for ReplicaSet1:

mkdir /var/lib/replica10
mkdir /var/lib/replica11
mkdir /var/lib/replica12

Commands for ReplicaSet2:

mkdir /var/lib/replica20
mkdir /var/lib/replica21
mkdir /var/lib/replica22

Commands for ReplicaSet3:

mkdir /var/lib/replica30
mkdir /var/lib/replica31
mkdir /var/lib/replica32

To create the Config Server, you need to use the –configsvr parameter in your mongod command along with the path for your database, its port value and the logpath. Use the following syntax for the mongod command:

mongod --configsvr --dbpath value --port value --fork --logpath value –logappend

Use the following commands to create three Config Servers:

Command for Server 1:

mongod --configsvr --dbpath /var/lib/cfgsvr0 --port 27021 --fork --logpath /var/lib/cfgsvr1/log --logappend

Command for Server 2:

mongod --configsvr --dbpath /var/lib/cfgsvr1 --port 27022 --fork --logpath /var/lib/cfgsvr1/log --logappend

Command for Server 3:

mongod --configsvr --dbpath /var/lib/cfgsvr2 --port 27023 --fork --logpath /var/lib/cfgsvr1/log –logappend

Once you’ve created the Config Servers successfully, you will see the following output on your screen:

about to fork child process, waiting until server is ready for connections.
forked process: #process_id
child process started successfully, parent exiting

This is how you can create Config Servers to set up MongoDB Replication using Sharding.

Step 2: Creating Shard Servers for MongoDB

To implement MongoDB Replication using Sharding, you need to start your Shard Servers as Replica Sets, which makes use of the Master-Slave mechanism.

To create the Shard Server, you need to use the –shardsvr parameter in your mongod command along with the path for your database, its port value, logpath and the –repelSet parameter to specify the Replica Set. Use the following syntax for the mongod command:

mongod --shardsvr --replSet value --dbpath value 1 --logpath value --port value --logappend --smallfiles --oplogSize 50 --fork –nojournal

Use the mongod commands three times for each Replica Set to start the Shard Server as follows:

MongoDB Replication: Starting Shard Servers | Hevo Data
Image Source: Self
Step 3: Starting the Servers to initiate MongoDB Replication

Once you’ve created your Shard Servers, you now need to configure every Shard. Begin by staring the first Replica Set which uses the port 27010 using the mongo command as follows:

mongo --port 27010

Use the initiate command to start the Replication process and then add your MongoDB instances to the Replica Set using the add function as follows:

rs.add("example.com:27011")
rs.add("example.com:27012")

To check whether the MongoDB instances were successfully added to the Replica set, use the status command as follows:

rs.status()

Perform the same operation for both ReplicaSet2 and ReplicaSet 3 as follows:

MongoDB Replication: Configuring Replica Set
Image Source: Self

Once you’ve added your Replica Sets, you need to link them together. You can do this as follows:

MongoDB Replication: Linking Replica Sets
Image Source: Self

This is how you start Config and Shard Servers to initiate MongoDB Replication. 

Step 4: Adding Shards to MongoDB Shard Servers

To start the Sharding process, you need to start your mongos servers and add various Shards to the Shard Servers. Use the following command to start the mongos server:

mongo --port 47017

To add Shards, you will need to use the addShard function and pass your Replica Sets as the parameter:

sh.addShard("ReplicaSet1/example.com:27010")
sh.addShard("ReplicaSet2/example.com:27020")
sh.addShard("ReplicaSet3/example.com:27030")

You can check the status of Shards as follows:

sh.status()

This will generate the following output:

MongoDB Replication: Adding Shards Status
Image Source: Self

This is how you can add Shards to your Shard Servers.

Step 5: Testing the Replication process 

To test the Replication process, create a new database to store some documents. Create a database called movies and a collection called movie_info and add documents to it as follows: 

use movies
for(i=0;i<10;i++){ db.movie_info.insert( {_id:i,name:"dir_name"+i,author:"Neil"} ) }

Now enable Sharding for the movies database as follows:

sh.enableSharding(“movies”)

Once you’ve enabled Sharding for the database, you need to enable it for the collection. You can do it as follows:

sh.shardCollection(“movies.movie_info”,{_id:1},true)

Add a few more documents and use the status command as follows:

for(i=0;i<50000;i++){ db.movie_info.insert( {_id:i,name:"dir_name"+i,author:"Neil"} ) }

db.movie_info.stats()

From the output generated by this command, you can easily see out of 49999 documents each Replica Set contains a certain number of them.

This is how you can use Sharding to set up MongoDB Replication.

Converting a Shard Standalone to Shard Replica Set

MongoDB allows its users to transform their Shard standalone into a Shard Replica Set. Standalone instances are used in the testing and development process, whereas the Replica Sets are a part of the production phase.

First, shut down your mongod instance using the following command:

db.adminCommand({"shutdown":"1"})

Now restart your Shard instance. You must use the –repelSet parameter in your command to specify the MongoDB Replica Set (this can be the same as the name of your MongoDB Shard) you’re going to use. Users must specify the name of the server along with their unique IPs in their command as follows:

mongod --port value --dbpath value --shardsvr --replSet shardA --bind_ip localhost,<ip address of the mongod host>

Connect your Mongo Shell with your MongoDB instance to start Sharding your MongoDB instance and use the initiate command to start the Replication process and successfully convert your Shard standalone instance into a Shard Replica Set.

You can now perform all the basic operations such as adding an instance, removing an instance, etc. using the following commands:

rs.add(“<host_name:port>”) & rs.remove(“host-name”)

You can even check the status of your Replica Set using the rs.status() and rs.conf() commands.

Once your Replica Set is operational, you can retrieve information about the Shard by connecting the Mongo Shell to one of the mongos instances as follows:

var myShard = db.getSiblingDB("config").shards.findOne( { _id: "<name>"})

Replace the name field with the name of your Shard. If you are using the same name as your Replica Set, you can directly use it, or you can use the sh.status() command and note down the Shard name from the Shards section as follows:

shards:
      { "_id" : "shard0000", "host" : "example1.net:27018", "state" : 1 }
      { "_id" : "shard0001", "host" : "example2.net:27018", "state" : 1 }

Once you have the information about your Shards, you need to update it to your host server. You can do this using the following command:

myShard.host = "<replica-set>/<member>

Replace the “replica-set” parameter with the name of your Replica Set and the member parameter with any member of that Replica Set. For example, if you’re using ShardA as your Replica Set, you can write your command as follows:

shardA/example1.net:27018

Save your configuration settings using the following command:

db.getSiblingDB("config").shards.save(myShard, { writeConcern: { w: "majority" } } )

Perform the same operation for all your Shard standalone and give each of them a distinct name. This is how you can convert your standalone Shard instance into a Shard Replica Set and perform MongoDB Replication.

For further information on using MongoDB Shards, you can check the official documentation here.

Conclusion

This article teaches you how to set up MongoDB Replication with ease and answers all your queries regarding it. It provides a brief introduction of various concepts related to it & helps the users understand them better and use them to perform data replication & recovery in the most efficient way possible using various methods.

These methods, however, can be challenging especially for a beginner as it is quite effort-intensive and requires in-depth technical expertise.

Hevo is a No-code alternative for MongoDB Replication and helps replicate data from MongoDB, MongoDB Atlas to any destination of your choice. Hevo caters to 100+ data sources (including 40+ free sources) and can seamlessly perform MongoDB Replication in real-time.

Hevo’s fault-tolerant architecture ensures a consistent and secure replication for your MongoDB data. It will make your life easier and make data replication hassle-free.

Learn more about Hevo

Want to take Hevo for a spin? Sign Up for a 14-day free trial and experience the feature-rich Hevo suite firsthand.

Why don’t you share your experience of setting up MongoDB Replication in the comments? We would love to hear from you!

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